How Does Heroin Affect the Brain?

How Does Heroin Affect the Brain?

Heroin works in the body to cause a reduction of pain, but it also negatively impacts the brain and can cause addiction. 

If you are worried that you or a loved one may be addicted to heroin, contact Findlay Recovery today. Our Ohio addiction treatment center is designed to support individuals with multiple types of addiction and can safely help you get clean and teach you the strategies to stay clean.

What is Heroin?

Heroin is an opioid pain killer that impacts how the body reacts to pain stimuli. When an individual is in pain, chronic or temporary, the opioid pain receptors work to identify the painful location and inflame the nerve endings. The chemical compound in heroin works to block this pain receptor and calm the nerve endings, effectively numbing the pain. 

Heroin, while it was used as a medication approximately 100 years ago, was found to be an addictive substance and has since been made illegal. When individuals use heroin, they experience pain relief and a calming and “restful” high. This is due to the slowing of the system. This depressant slows the body and numbs it.

How Does Heroin Affect the Brain?

Heroin’s effect on the brain is multifaceted. Heroin affects multiple brain parts, including the reward center and the nervous system.

Heroin mimics the brain’s neurotransmitters, but in doing so, it confuses the system and causes them to attach to the drug instead of naturally produced neurotransmitters. When the attachment occurs, it activates the nerve cells but in a manner that confuses the brain and body. 

When heroin overstimulates the reward center with its calming and mellow high, individuals start to crave and want the drug. This is one of the first red flags of addiction. The drug is beginning to run in the body, and when the body doesn’t get it, it will react badly.

What are the Signs of Heroin Abuse?

The signs of heroin abuse look different based on the effects of heroin on the brain. Individuals who use heroin often struggle with multiple personal and social issues and the physical problems that heroin can affect in the body.

Heroin impacts a person’s personal and social life. Individuals struggling with addiction will spend a significant amount of time thinking about the drug, using, recovering from use, and because heroin is illegal, thinking about how to hide or cover up their use. This can cause issues for individuals at work, including attendance, responsibility, and accuracy problems. 

Physically, heroin is a dangerous opioid that can result in overdose. When an individual uses heroin to excess, it can shut down the body’s functions. Slowed breathing, inability to wake, and loss of consciousness are common for individuals who use heroin. This can cause brain damage. Other specific health concerns come into play with how the drug is used. Because heroin can be smoked, snorted, injected, or rubbed on the gums, specific health concerns are raised with each location. Smoking heroin impacts the lungs, while snorting heroin impacts the blood vessels in the nose specifically. Injecting heroin can increase the likelihood of transmittable diseases and injection site infections, and rubbing heroin on the gums can cause receding gumlines. All heroin use has been connected with the higher-than-average probability of cancer development. 

What to Look for in a Heroin Detox Program

When looking for a heroin addiction program, it is important to consider the severity of the addiction and the client’s needs. Many heroin users struggle with multiple disorders and are more likely to be using various substances than other illegal substances. In many cases, using a heroin detox program in Ohio is going to be about more than just getting clean. 

Heroin detox programs are broken down and differentiated by the client’s needs. In many cases, individuals who need the most help start with detoxification and transition directly into inpatient rehabilitation, like that available at Findlay Recovery.

Individuals who utilize Findlay Recovery’s heroin addiction treatment program are more capable of maintaining their sobriety in the face of triggers and stressors after completing their combination of traditional and alternative treatment programs with fidelity.

Findlay Recovery also uses personalized treatment options to support clients’ well-being. Allowing individuals to work through treatments and the best and safest options for each person makes the program more supportive. Contact Findlay Recovery today to find comprehensive addiction treatment in Ohio.

How Does Heroin Affect the Brain?

How Does Heroin Affect the Brain?

Heroin works in the body to cause a reduction of pain, but it also negatively impacts the brain and can cause addiction. 

If you are worried that you or a loved one may be addicted to heroin, contact Findlay Recovery today. Our Ohio addiction treatment center is designed to support individuals with multiple types of addiction and can safely help you get clean and teach you the strategies to stay clean.

What is Heroin?

Heroin is an opioid pain killer that impacts how the body reacts to pain stimuli. When an individual is in pain, chronic or temporary, the opioid pain receptors work to identify the painful location and inflame the nerve endings. The chemical compound in heroin works to block this pain receptor and calm the nerve endings, effectively numbing the pain. 

Heroin, while it was used as a medication approximately 100 years ago, was found to be an addictive substance and has since been made illegal. When individuals use heroin, they experience pain relief and a calming and “restful” high. This is due to the slowing of the system. This depressant slows the body and numbs it.

How Does Heroin Affect the Brain?

Heroin’s effect on the brain is multifaceted. Heroin affects multiple brain parts, including the reward center and the nervous system.

Heroin mimics the brain’s neurotransmitters, but in doing so, it confuses the system and causes them to attach to the drug instead of naturally produced neurotransmitters. When the attachment occurs, it activates the nerve cells but in a manner that confuses the brain and body. 

When heroin overstimulates the reward center with its calming and mellow high, individuals start to crave and want the drug. This is one of the first red flags of addiction. The drug is beginning to run in the body, and when the body doesn’t get it, it will react badly.

What are the Signs of Heroin Abuse?

The signs of heroin abuse look different based on the effects of heroin on the brain. Individuals who use heroin often struggle with multiple personal and social issues and the physical problems that heroin can affect in the body.

Heroin impacts a person’s personal and social life. Individuals struggling with addiction will spend a significant amount of time thinking about the drug, using, recovering from use, and because heroin is illegal, thinking about how to hide or cover up their use. This can cause issues for individuals at work, including attendance, responsibility, and accuracy problems. 

Physically, heroin is a dangerous opioid that can result in overdose. When an individual uses heroin to excess, it can shut down the body’s functions. Slowed breathing, inability to wake, and loss of consciousness are common for individuals who use heroin. This can cause brain damage. Other specific health concerns come into play with how the drug is used. Because heroin can be smoked, snorted, injected, or rubbed on the gums, specific health concerns are raised with each location. Smoking heroin impacts the lungs, while snorting heroin impacts the blood vessels in the nose specifically. Injecting heroin can increase the likelihood of transmittable diseases and injection site infections, and rubbing heroin on the gums can cause receding gumlines. All heroin use has been connected with the higher-than-average probability of cancer development. 

What to Look for in a Heroin Detox Program

When looking for a heroin addiction program, it is important to consider the severity of the addiction and the client’s needs. Many heroin users struggle with multiple disorders and are more likely to be using various substances than other illegal substances. In many cases, using a heroin detox program in Ohio is going to be about more than just getting clean. 

Heroin detox programs are broken down and differentiated by the client’s needs. In many cases, individuals who need the most help start with detoxification and transition directly into inpatient rehabilitation, like that available at Findlay Recovery.

Individuals who utilize Findlay Recovery’s heroin addiction treatment program are more capable of maintaining their sobriety in the face of triggers and stressors after completing their combination of traditional and alternative treatment programs with fidelity.
Findlay Recovery also uses personalized treatment options to support clients’ well-being. Allowing individuals to work through treatments and the best and safest options for each person makes the program more supportive. Contact Findlay Recovery today to find comprehensive addiction treatment in Ohio.

Are Benzos Addictive?

Are Benzos Addictive?

Benzodiazepines are a pharmacological mood regulator. Designed to support individuals through anxiety and insomnia, benzos quickly became popular on the illegal market. Sedatives like Valium, Halcion, Klonopin, and Xanax fall into the benzo family, and abuse of these drugs can land someone in the hospital with a number of side effects.

If you’re worried that you or your loved one may be addicted to Benzos or are misusing them, contact Findlay Recovery today. Our addiction treatment facility in Ohio is designed to support clients through various alcohol and drug addictions and help clients develop a plan for healthy living in the future.

What are Benzos?

Benzodiazepines are prescription sedatives designed to increase the GABA levels in the brain and cause a relaxed feeling. This prescription medication is often prescribed to individuals with anxiety, panic disorders, PTSD, and insomnia; this prescription medication is designed to be taken in small doses as needed or regularly for consistent effects. Individuals who use benzos regularly are monitored to ensure that the drug is working correctly, no other contraindicated substances are being used or abused, and that the organs continue to function normally while using the medication.

Benzo use commonly causes sedation and dizziness, but other serious side effects can include: 

  • Delirium
  • Paranoia
  • Suicidal thoughts or actions
  • Seizures
  • Difficulty breathing.

These side effects indicate how dangerous taking an unregulated diazepine can be. If you believe that you need help today, reach out to Findlay Recovery. Our comprehensive Ohio rehab program is designed to support individuals just like you.

Are Benzos Addictive?

Benzos addiction does occur, which is why this prescription drug is so closely monitored. Individuals using the medication can develop a tolerance and dependence on the drug, increasing the likelihood of developing an addiction. Benzo misuse that leads to addiction occurs when individuals alter the prescription or method of use when taking the drug. This is dangerous because it puts people at an increased health risk and addiction risk. 

Tolerance and dependence on benzodiazepines occur when individuals take the drug consistently long enough for the body to develop a natural response to the stimulus. However, soon the body will require more drugs to produce the same effect. This is the primary trigger of addiction because individuals misuse their prescription when this occurs, which has health and addiction risks.

Benzo misuse occurs when individuals take the medication in a way that it is not meant to be or simply take a drug that is not prescribed to them. When these situations occur, individuals are at a higher risk of developing an addiction to the drug.

Unregulated use of benzodiazepines is especially dangerous. Benzos are a prescription because they need to be monitored and prescribed based on height, weight, and medical history. When individuals take them illegally, they are at risk of an overdose. Benzodiazepine overdose can occur when individuals have too much of the drug in their system. 

Signs of a benzodiazepine overdose include slurred speech, ataxia, and altered mental status. While these are not life-threatening, taking benzos with any other medication can create a life-threatening situation. 

When taken illegally, benzos are often mixed, knowingly or unknowingly, with opioids which can cause fatal organ depression. In approximately 16% of opioid overdose deaths, benzodiazepines are noted in the system. This potential lethal combination is rapidly becoming popular in the unregulated drug market, making illicit use even more dangerous.

How to Find Benzo Addiction Treatment

Benzo addiction treatment is available in your area. You can find local support by contacting your insurance provider and accessing their approved in-network treatment centers list, or you can contact Findlay Recovery today and get access to our comprehensive detoxification and rehabilitation program in hours instead of days or weeks.

Findlay Recovery is a high-quality addiction treatment center that provides initial detoxification services in preparation for entering our Ohio residential addiction treatment program. Individuals who enter our program can access a combination of the most supportive traditional and alternative therapies that encourage individuals to focus on the future and make mindful changes that will influence future actions. 

At Findlay Recovery, the staff works with each client to develop a treatment program that addresses their specific concerns and helps them work towards their individual sobriety goals. Need help on the recovery journey? Contact Findlay Recovery today.

What are the Most Commonly Abused Drugs?

What are the Most Commonly Abused Drugs?

While any drug has the potential to be misused, not all drugs can create the same havoc that commonly abused drugs can. Illegal drugs and many prescription drugs are more likely to be abused than others based on how they interact in the body, making them naturally more addictive and more prone to misuse.

At Findlay Recovery, we help people through all stages of the recovery process and with detox and recovery from the most commonly abused substances. Contact an admissions counselor to see how we can help you today.

What are the Most Commonly Abused Drugs?

What are the Most Commonly Abused Drugs?

The most commonly abused drugs fall into several different categories; Opioids and opiates, stimulants, CNS depressants, and mood-altering drugs.

Opiates and opioids are commonly known as pain killers and work to block pain in the body. Individuals can take these drugs orally, inject, snort up the nose, or smoke. Common opioids include morphine, codeine, hydrocodone, and illegal drugs like heroin and fentanyl.

Stimulants cover both illegal and legal drugs as well. Cocaine, methamphetamines, and ADHD medication all have similar components that stimulate the brain and body, causing hyperfocus, increased movement (jitteriness), and increased heart rate and blood pressure. 

CNS depressants are another commonly abused substance. CNS depressants work to depress the central nervous system (CNS) and are prescribed as an anti-anxiety medication to treat insomnia. These depressants are designed to help individuals function at a more regulated pace but are also addictive because of how they impact the brain.

Lastly, mood-altering drugs are commonly abused. Medications used to fight depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder are considered some of the most abused drugs because of how they are taken. Taking these drugs irregularly can lead to addiction, as the misuse can be detrimental to the individual’s overall mental health.

Alcohol is also a commonly abused substance that can lead to addiction. Binge drinking, drinking underaged, and mixing medication with alcohol are all dangerous and can be warning signs of addiction. 

What are the Signs of Drug Addiction?

What are the Most Commonly Abused Drugs?

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, there are 11 different factors to consider when looking for signs that your loved one may be using drugs.

  1. Taking drugs longer or more frequently than planned. This can indicate an inability to stop use and be a warning for developing tolerance to a drug. 
  2. Trying to stop but being unable. If your loved one has tried to stop using and has been unable to or has relapsed multiple times, it could indicate an inability to stop. 
  3. Spends most of their time getting, using, or recovering from the drug.
  4. Cravings. This means the body has developed a want or need for the drug. 
  5. They have become increasingly unreliable and nonresponsible. Missing deadlines and failing to remember or participate in assigned activities can also indicate an addiction.
  6. Continued use, even if it’s causing problems in your relationship or the relationship with a loved one.
  7. Giving up important activities because of drugs or problems related to use. This also includes avoiding conflict with others’ overuse.
  8. Continue use, even if it puts them in danger. Unfortunately, individuals who use drugs often find themselves in increasingly risky or dangerous situations that indicate a substance use problem.
  9. Continue use, even if it puts their physical and mental health at risk. Willingly risking psychological and physical health over a drug demonstrates the focus of their brain and body on use.
  10. Taking more of the drug to achieve the same effects. 
  11. Withdrawal symptoms that can be stopped by using more of the drug.

While these factors are not guarantees, they offer insight into the life of an addict and the signs you can look for if you are worried about a co-worker or loved one.

How to Find Addiction Treatment Programs

Addiction treatment programs are designed to help individuals work through their problematic use and develop healthy coping and self-management skills. To find a program that is ideal for you, you must first know what is necessary to succeed. Many people find that an inpatient facility can provide the most accurate and supportive care when they are just starting their rehabilitation journey. 

Findlay Recovery is the ideal choice for an individual in Ohio struggling with addiction. In our Ohio rehab, clients work through individualized treatment programs designed to meet their specific needs through comprehensive, holistic treatment. 
Contact us today to see how we can help you or a loved one with their addiction.

What are the Signs of Cocaine Use?

What are the Signs of Cocaine Use?

If you are searching the internet about the outcomes of cocaine use, the signs that someone may be using, or what kind of treatment is available, you or a loved one is likely suffering from an addiction to cocaine.

Cocaine use impacts over 5 million people annually, and claims many lives daily. The good news is, help and treatment are readily available.

Get help for your loved one or yourself at Findlay Recovery. Our comprehensive detox and addiction treatment program is designed to support clients in the early stages of recovery and help them develop long-lasting skills that are necessary for sustainable sobriety.

What is Cocaine?

Cocaine is a stimulant drug. This stimulant is made naturally using the coca plant, native to Central and South America. According to the DEA, 90% of the cocaine in the United States comes from Columbia, where it is grown, harvested, and then processed into the drug before being shipped to the United States. 

Cocaine is the most common illegal stimulant in the United States. Approximately 5.2 million people used cocaine in the last year, while 1.3 have a diagnosable cocaine use disorder. Cocaine is also deadly. In 2020, over 19,000 people died from a cocaine overdose. That is approximately 53 people per day. 

Cocaine is so dangerous because of the way that it impacts the body and how it is used. Cocaine increases the functions associated with the central nervous system, including heart rate, breathing, temperature, and digestion. This can easily lead to overdose-related heart attacks and seizures. 

Cocaine, unlike opioids, does not have a drug to help stop an overdose. This is especially common when individuals binge use cocaine. Cocaine works quickly in the system, and its effects often wear off within an hour. Individuals must continue to take hits of the drug to maintain the high, but because of how cocaine impacts the body, each hit is dangerous and can cause the body to overdose. 

What are the Signs of Cocaine Use?

Individuals who are using cocaine may experience many psychological and physical symptoms. Cocaine addiction causes individuals to spend a majority of their time thinking about, using, and recovering from use. 

Psychologically, cocaine users may be jittery, more likely to take risks, energetic, and talkative. Because it stimulates the body, cocaine users are often more excitable during use, but this can also lead to the development of sensitivity. Individuals who use cocaine frequently may bypass the happiness and excitement related to use and experience paranoia, anxiety, and irritability. They may also be more prone to erratic behavior and violence. 

Physically, cocaine speeds up the body’s functions. As a result, users can experience disturbances in heart rhythm, heart attacks, headaches, seizures, or even comas.

What are Cocaine Withdrawal Symptoms and Treatment?

When an individual stops using cocaine or ends a cocaine binge, they crash almost immediately. During this crash, individuals will experience cravings, feelings of fatigue, anxiety, irritability, and paranoia. While this typically wears off after a day, individuals may experience long-term side effects like cravings and depression. Cocaine withdrawal has often also been linked to suicidal thoughts. 

Researchers are currently working on multiple pharmacological approaches, but none have been widely tested. However, several have proven that monthly vaccinations designed to block cocaine and its ability to increase antibodies can dramatically decrease use and support the treatment process. 

The most commonly recommended treatment for cocaine use disorders is behavioral therapy designed around supporting clients through the depression and cravings that last months following the previous use of cocaine. 

How to Find Cocaine Addiction Treatment in Ohio

Cocaine addiction treatment in Ohio is available through inpatient, intensive outpatient, and outpatient facilities. In addition, based on the need determined by the severity of your addiction to cocaine, many individuals begin the cocaine addiction treatment process with detox and inpatient treatment.

We recommend our new, state-of-the-art facility, Findlay Recovery. Our Ohio inpatient treatment programs are designed to support clients in the early stages of addiction treatment and help them address major initial concerns around substance abuse, future planning, and learning. 
Contact our admissions counselors today to see how we can support you on your recovery journey.

What is the Timeline for Opioid Detox?

For those with an opioid addiction, detox will likely be needed before treatment can begin.

Some of the most common questions asked of individuals going through withdrawal at an opioid detox program are, how long with this take? How long will I feel this poorly? When will I feel better? When will I feel like myself again??

While the answer is different for everyone, opioid detox typically follows a pretty prescribed timeline that can help individuals plan for their future.

At Findlay Recovery, our highly-trained medical staff is ready to support you in whatever stage of recovery you are in, from the first day you don’t use to the last of an extensive inpatient treatment program. We provide a space for safe healing from addiction’s physical and psychological traumas.

Contact us today to see how we can support you on your recovery journey.

What are Opioids?

Opioids and opiates fall into the medication family known as depressants. They block and slow functions in the body to make it more difficult for pain transmitters to move through the body. While this might be ideal for individuals with severe pain, it can be dangerous because of its addictive nature.

Opioids are addictive and work because the body reacts positively to the lack of pain, the excess release of dopamine, and the stimulation of the reward center. Therefore, individuals who use prescription opioids are closely monitored and are put on limited supply because of this possibility.

Which Drugs are Opioids?

Opioids and opiates fall under two categories, legally prescribed prescription pain medication and illegally obtained downers. While the significant differences include who is monitoring intake, how likely you are to become addicted, and how powerful the opioid is, it can also include whether or not it is synthetically made.

Prescription pain medications like morphine, codeine, and hydrocodone all fall under the family of opioids and are extensively monitored. These prescription-grade medications are tested and prescribed based on weight, patient history, and need. 

Illegal opioids and opiates include opium, heroin, and fentanyl. Often individuals take these medications based on a recommendation from a dealer, not a medical professional, and there is no one to monitor the possibility of addiction.

What are the Symptoms of Opioid Use?

When an individual uses and becomes addicted to opioids, many symptoms impact the user physically and psychologically. 

Physically, when an individual becomes addicted to opioids, you may notice that they are often in a sleep state or relaxed. This is because opioids are a downer, and they impact the individual’s ability to function at an average pace. It can delay processing, make a person’s movements appear sluggish, and dramatically reduce reaction time. You may also notice that the person has significant weight gain or a persistent cough. These can both be related to opioid use.

A person may also have psychological symptoms related to addiction and use. In addition to delayed processing speed, individuals may make decisions that are not typical for them or spend most of their time thinking about, talking about, actively using, or recovering from use. This can be a dramatic or gradual change.

What is the Timeline for Opioid Detox?

Opioid withdrawal occurs after an individual stops taking the drug and begins the opioid detox process.

Typically within the first 24 hours, individuals start to feel the effects of withdrawal. This can include physical symptoms like feeling poorly, like the start of the cold or flu, with chills and nausea. There are also mental symptoms that start this early. Cravings, anxiety, and depression are common in the first hours and can increase severity as the drug wears off entirely.

With opioid detox in Ohio, an individual’s symptoms usually peak around the 3-4 day mark. At this time, individuals withdrawing can expect to feel extreme physical symptoms like diarrhea, chills, vomiting, muscle pain, and body aches. Additional mental and emotional symptoms like irritability, insomnia, and exhaustion are common.

At the week mark, most individuals start to feel relief from the physical symptoms but must continue to battle emotional and psychological symptoms like tiredness, anxiousness, and frustration.

The month mark is where individuals begin to level out. The remaining symptoms include cravings, depression, and lingering health concerns that have not yet cleared up.

How to Find Opioid Detox Programs in Ohio

There are several opioid detox programs, but they do not meet the high-quality standard that Findlay Recovery can offer. Our comprehensive detox and addiction treatment programs in Ohio can help individuals often on the same day they request help. 

Our clients can access supportive and motivating treatment through thorough treatment with multiple traditional and alternative styles. By helping our clients develop the necessary skills for sustainable recovery, we provide a safe and educational addiction treatment experience. 
No matter where you are on the opioid withdrawal timeline, the staff at Findlay Recovery can help. Contact us today.

How to Find Rehab Covered by Frontpath Insurance

Finding in-network treatment is crucial for many seeking recovery. Click here to find professional rehab covered by Frontpath insurance.

When it comes to finding rehab covered by health insurance, it is best to find one in-network. Finding in-network treatment ensures that you are attending a vetted program and will pay the least out of pocket for your addiction treatment.

At Findlay Recovery, our clients work through detoxification and inpatient treatment in an Ohio facility designed to cater to their individual rehabilitative needs. With traditional and alternative therapies available for all clients, we work to discover what works best and is most beneficial for all clients. 

Contact us today to verify your insurance policy and figure out how we can help you down the path of recovery today.

Does Insurance Usually Cover Rehab Treatment?

Insurance usually covers several rehab treatment options. For example, your insurance may cover inpatient treatment, intensive outpatient treatment, or outpatient rehabilitation, depending on your medical diagnosis. 

Inpatient treatment is typically covered for individuals with severe substance use disorders. This includes clients who struggle with additional mental health concerns, severe withdrawal symptoms, and have multiple indicators for addiction. For this type of rehab to be covered, it often requires a doctor’s prescription and pre-approval for treatment or the location. 

The next level of treatment covered by insurance is an intensive outpatient treatment and partial hospitalization. Clients in this category often struggle with a moderate substance use disorder without additional mental health concerns. Additionally, these clients have a safe and drug-free home environment that is supportive of their rehabilitation. This level of addiction treatment also typically requires a medical prescription but, based on your insurance policy, may not. 

Finally, the lowest level of addiction treatment, which often doesn’t require a prescription, is outpatient treatment. This, as long as it is in-network, is typically covered by insurance and can support clients with mild to moderate substance use disorders. This type of addiction treatment requires patients to meet with counselors and group therapy several times a week and can last upwards of 90 days or more. 

All of these various levels of rehabilitative treatment are available through insurance and are dependent on your policy. Policy levels may include multiple options, and some may consist of a cost to you, the client. Finding an in-network addiction treatment center will provide the most coverage for your treatment. It can ensure that you pay the least amount possible out of pocket for your rehabilitation.

What Does Frontpath Insurance Cover?

FrontPath Health Coalition is a not-for-profit group dedicated to improving the cost ratio for health care services in their given area. FrontPath, while working to reform the healthcare market in its local areas, has developed a comprehensive PPO network to provide its users with the best and lowest healthcare costs. 

Through FrontPath Health Coalition, many rehabs are covered. These addiction treatment centers include inpatient treatment, outpatient treatment, and various intensive outpatient programs that bridge the gap between inpatient and outpatient treatment to provide the appropriate level of care necessary for sustainable recovery. 

How to Find Rehab Covered by Frontpath Insurance

If you are using FrontPath Health Coalition, there are many ways to see what your coverage includes. First, by contacting FrontPath HC, you can have an employee verify your policy. When your policy is confirmed, the individual can check to see your coverage costs, what percentage you stand to pay out of pocket, and which local rehabs are covered within the PPO network. This extra step can ensure that you get the most robust coverage at the lowest cost. Addiction treatment should never be skimped on. Instead, allow your insurance to pick up most of the tab and get the healthcare treatment you need.

Another way to see what FrontPath Health Coalition can do for you is by contacting the local rehabilitation center you are considering and having them verify your insurance. When they confirm your insurance policy and guarantee your coverage, the rehab center can provide you with a more exact cost for treatment through their program. If the facility, even with insurance, is out of your price range, many rehabs can offer suggestions for other local substance use support.

At Findlay Recovery, we work with all individuals to help them get the support they need to kick the habit. By accepting multiple insurances and providing a variety of treatment options, our clients can work through a program that best meets their needs and can ensure their sobriety.
Speak with an admissions coordinator today to verify your insurance coverage.

Does UMR Insurance Cover Addiction Treatment?

Does UMR Insurance Cover Addiction Treatment?

UMR Insurance is designed to support you when dealing with your insurance policy. As a third-party administrator, UMR Insurance is paid for by your insurer to ensure that you have access to the health care you need. 

At Findlay Recovery, we work with UMR to verify your insurance policy and ensure your treatment is funded and meets your specific healthcare needs. In addition, through various treatment programs, we work with individuals to provide the care and support they need to recover from substance abuse and achieve sobriety.

Contact Findlay Recovery today. We can verify your insurance with UMR and get you on the path to recovery.

What are the Signs Someone Needs Addiction Treatment?

There are many signs that your loved one may need addiction treatment. These signs may vary based on the drug, length of use, and how they take the drug, but there are some standard signs of addiction to look out for. 

Some common behaviors of addiction and substance use disorder include:

  1. Being unable to cut down or stop drug use, despite wanting to.
  2. Using drugs to deal with difficult emotions.
  3. Taking one drug to recover from the effects of another.
  4. Failing to meet obligations at school or work as a result of drug use.
  5. Problems in relationships due to drug use.
  6. Being scared at the thought of running out of drugs.
  7. Stealing drugs or money to pay for drugs.
  8. Having financial, criminal, or health issues due to drug use.
  9. Requiring higher doses of a drug, or taking a drug more often, to achieve the same effects.
  10. Taking too much of a drug, leading to an overdose.

These are the same standards that groups like Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous based their attendance and questioning. 

Additionally, answering these questions for yourself or your loved one can help you determine if you feel like you or they are struggling with a substance abuse problem. These questions are similar to the questions a therapist or counselor will ask. 

To diagnose someone with a substance use disorder, medical professionals will attempt to determine if you have experienced any of those symptoms in the last year while using a substance. Additionally, they will check to see if you have experienced withdrawal symptoms or cravings when not using. The existence of any of these signs can indicate a substance use disorder. More severe substance use disorders are associated with more signs.

Does Insurance Cover Rehab?

Federal law dictates that rehab is covered in some form by your insurance policy. However, the extent of your coverage can vary significantly based on the type of insurance, the amount of coverage you have, and which companies accept your policy as in-network vs. out-of-network. 

At a minimum, insurance policies often cover some form of outpatient therapy through an in-network treatment facility. Sometimes this is precisely what an individual needs; however, there are times that clients need more support than outpatient treatment can offer. In times like these, it’s essential to know if you have a more severe substance use disorder, what supports are available through your insurance to access that level of rehabilitative care.

Does UMR Insurance Cover Addiction Treatment?

UMR works with your insurance provider, who covers many types of addiction treatment depending on your insurance policy. Through the UMR medical services website, you can search to find an in-network rehab and find the specific coverage you are qualified for under your policy. 

However, suppose you are struggling to find something that you think will work for you by contacting UMR medical services with your policy information and needs assessment. In that case, they can provide you with a list of available and approved UMR in-network rehabs. 

The last available option is to see if the rehab you are looking for is covered directly as a UMR in-network rehab center. To do this, you can contact the rehab center directly. Most rehabilitation centers will verify your insurance, and through that, they can give you an accurate account of the fees your UMR insurance policy doesn’t cover. 

How to Find Addiction Treatment Covered by Insurance

When searching for addiction treatment covered through UMR insurance, it’s crucial to not only look at what your policy covers but what the in-network treatment facilities can offer you. 

Findlay Recovery is a new facility that accepts most health insurance and works with UMR to verify your coverage to ensure you have the most accurate and up-to-date information about your addiction treatment. 

Findlay Recovery offers both detoxification programs and inpatient residential treatment for individuals with moderate to severe substance use disorders or those with a substance use disorder and a comorbid mental health disorder that requires additional treatment. Our staff is trained to deal with illicit substances, prescription drugs, and alcohol. 

Individuals looking to change their lifestyle and need rehabilitative support should seek help through Findlay Recovery. Our inpatient addiction treatment programming in Ohio offers a supportive, structured, and traditional approach to addiction treatment.

What Does HealthSCOPE Insurance Cover?

What Does HealthSCOPE Insurance Cover?

HealthSCOPE insurance is coverage for self-funded employers and covers options for detoxification and rehabilitation. Individuals using this insurance should contact their provider or the treatment center of their choice to see what is specifically covered on their policy.

At Findlay Recovery Center, we accept HelathSCOPE insurance and verify benefits with clients before entering our new fully comprehensive detoxification and rehabilitation center.

To see what your HealthSCOPE insurance covers, contact us today.

What are the Signs Someone is Abusing Drugs?

Individuals who are abusing drugs can be in many different stages of addiction. While their drug use may be problematic and using an unsafe substance or amount, not all abuse is addiction. 

When an individual abuses drugs, it means they are misusing a substance. Misuse can occur out of ignorance or on purpose. Those who use illegal drugs are consistently misusing a substance, while prescription drugs may look different.

Signs of abuse when someone is misusing illegal drugs include changes in behavior, appearance, social interactions, primary relationships, and work-related responsibilities. You may also notice that individuals who abuse illicit drugs have several physical symptoms that impact their ability to interact or respond in situations.

However, individuals who misuse prescription drugs may present differently. For example, those individuals may take the medication incorrectly by taking more than they should or too frequently. They may also use the drug with other substances, which can create a different high and be more dangerous and increase the likelihood of developing an addiction to the substance. 

How to Convince Someone to Go to Rehab?

When an individual abuses drugs, it can sometimes be challenging to convince them to rehab. When a person cannot see the scope of the problem they are struggling with, it can be a challenge. To convince someone to go to rehab, you should follow several steps.

  1. Be prepared with a plan. Before confronting someone about their substance abuse, make sure that you have a plan for getting help, either through a counselor or a detox and rehabilitation program that is set up and covered by their insurance.
  2. Use “I” statements. When confronting someone about substance abuse, they can often be confrontational and aggressive. When using “I” statements, you share how you feel and how their actions have impacted you. “You” statements can be seen as accusatory and derail a conversation.
  3. Know and set your boundaries. After recommending rehabilitation to your loved one, set your limit. Do not let them cross this boundary. Your boundaries can range from no more financial support to no more contact or any other boundary you feel your loved one has crossed.

Getting help has to be your loved one’s choice, but you can set them up for success by following those options.

What Does HealthSCOPE Insurance Cover?

Following government legislation, HealthSCOPE Insurances covers some forms of detoxification, rehabilitation, and addiction treatment. As a result, HealthSCOPE rehab coverage will change based on your benefits package. The quickest way to find out how to see if your HealthSCOPE benefits insurance covers rehabilitation or a specific rehab is to call the number on the back of your insurance card and speak with a representative. They can give you detailed specifics of your coverage. 

Generally, HealthSCOPE insurance covers or partially covers drug and alcohol detoxification, alcohol rehab, heroin rehab, cocaine rehab, and prescription medication rehab. In addition, other drug rehabs may be included based on your HealthSCOPE benefits insurance. 

Another way to see if your HealthSCOPE rehab coverage is available at the detoxification center or rehabilitation facility you are looking into is by calling the location. Most detox and rehab locations will verify your insurance before entering the program. By doing this, you can get a realistic view of what is covered and any additional costs you may incur. 

How to Find In-Network HealthSCOPE Rehab Centers

To find an in-network HealthSCOPE rehab center, you can use your insurance carrier’s resources or representatives or contact the rehab of your choice to see if they accept HealthSCOPE rehab insurance.

Findlay Recovery Center is a fully comprehensive detoxification and addiction treatment center that accepts HealthSCOPE benefits insurance and can verify your exact benefits before arrival. 

At Findlay Recovery, we provide state-of-the-art addiction treatment designed to support individuals through several substance abuse problems, including dual diagnosis mental health disorders commonly linked with addiction. Contact Findlay Recovery to have a representative verify your coverage today

Why is Fentanyl So Addictive?

Why is Fentanyl So Addictive?

Fentanyl is on the news almost daily for its heavy-hitting impact on users. Fentanyl deaths occur at a rate of approximately 150 per day. 

Let us help you battle fentanyl addiction at Findlay Recovery. Our new treatment facility in Ohio can provide the best comprehensive addiction treatment to get you clean and on the path to recovery. We offer detoxification and residential inpatient programs to support clients through the most challenging first days of sobriety. 

Speak with an admissions coordinator to see about same-day help!

What is Fentanyl?

Fentanyl is an addictive opioid antagonist that works to block opioid pain receptors in the body. When this action occurs, the drug activates dopamine output in the brain, increasing the body’s response to the drug. Excessive dopamine levels create a euphoric high that inspires and encourages the body to relax, triggering the reward center of the brain. This high cause the body to want the drug.

Fentanyl, derived from opium, heroin, and morphine, has claimed the lives of approximately 60,000 people in 2020 alone. Fentanyl is now the primary synthetic opioid overdose and doubles and triples overdose rates for drugs like psychostimulants, heroin, and cocaine. 

Fentanyl is also extremely dangerous because of how it is created on the street. Often the drug is made too strong or not cut into a small enough dose to not be fatal. Additionally, to make Fentanyl go further, Fentanyl has been found to be cut with everything from powdered baby formula to arsenic. 

Why is Fentanyl So Addictive?

Fentanyl is so addictive because of the high that it creates and how powerful the drug is. Individuals who use Fentanyl to get high battle an excessive amount of dopamine released into the body. This, combined with the depression of the central nervous system, damages and alters their body and mind. Individuals who use Fentanyl to get high have an increased risk of overdose due to how powerful and how quickly the drug impacts the body.

In some instances, individuals who use Fentanyl can overdose and die before a dose of Narcan/Naloxone can even be administered. In most cases, however, individuals can receive a dose of the life-saving drug that will put them into immediate opioid withdrawal syndrome. 

What are the Signs of Fentanyl Use?

Fentanyl users can expect to experience an impact on their personal life, their professional life, and all significant social situations. In addition, individuals who use Fentanyl often experience a number of physical and mental symptoms that impact their ability to function in everyday life. 

Physical symptoms of fentanyl abuse include loss of consciousness, increased instances of constipation, nausea, and vomiting, and intake site issues. These physical symptoms can be immediate or intermittent with the use and abuse of the drug. Long-term symptoms of fentanyl abuse include kidney problems, liver issues, heart and lung disease, sexual dysfunction, and menstrual issues. Individuals who use Fentanyl also have an increased chance of contracting a blood-borne pathogen like HIV or Hepatitis C. These individuals also experience an increased risk of physical trauma and take more risks related to substance use.

Mentally, fentanyl users can expect to experience a number of ups and downs related to use. Euphoric highs lead to crashing lows, and this can lead to increases in episodes of anxiety, depression, increased incidences of personality disorders, and schizophrenia. Fentanyl has also been linked to psychosis related to drug use. 

How to Find Fentanyl Addiction Treatment Near Me

If you believe that you have a problem with fentanyl use, it is imperative that you find ‘fentanyl addiction treatment near me’ immediately. Fentanyl is extremely dangerous to the body, and the mind and individuals who are currently using it should seek treatment immediately. 

Places like Findlay Recovery in Findlay, Ohio, have the resources to support individuals in need of fentanyl addiction treatment. Our onsite detox program and addiction treatment center offer the best therapeutic support in a brand new facility run by individuals with decades of experience in addiction treatment.

Through comprehensive addiction treatment, we believe that our clients can achieve sobriety. We are ready with same-day admissions to support clients prepared to make this change in their life. Contact an admissions coordinator today to verify your insurance and see about getting the help you need today.